Christopher Hitchens & David Frum on Adoption, Churches, Drug Decriminalization (4/4)

December 11, 1996 www.amazon.com Watch the full program: thefilmarchived.blogspot.com Adoption in the United States is the legal act of permanently placing a person under the age of 18 with a parent or parents other than the birth parents in the United States. The 2000 census was the first census in which adoption statistics were collected. The number of children awaiting adoption dropped from 132000 to 118000 during the period 2000 to 2004 USA Adoption Chart. Drug liberalization is the process of eliminating or reducing drug prohibition laws. Variations of drug liberalization (also spelled liberalisation) include drug relegalization, drug legalization, and drug decriminalization. The cultivation, use and trade of psychoactive and other drugs has occurred since civilization’s existence. In the 20th century, the United States government led a major renewed surge in drug prohibition called the “War on Drugs.” Although the present War on Drugs is a modern phenomenon, drug laws have been a common feature of human law for several hundred years. Today’s War on Drugs bears many similarities to earlier drug laws, particularly in motivation. Motivations claimed by supporters of drug prohibition laws across various societies and eras have included religious observance, allegations of violence by racial minorities, and public health concerns. Those who are not proponents of anti-drug legislation characterize these motivations as religious intolerance, racism, and public healthism

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